Mulch, compost and worm farms

We encourage residents to take up composting and worm farming as effective ways to minimise the amount of waste going to landfill and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. 

Break it Down Worm Farm and Compost Bin Rebate Program

Due to the unprecedented demand and popularity of the program, this round of the rebate program has finished. Thanks to all our participating suppliers who helped to make the program a success. 

We are currently reviewing the program and encouraging residents who are interested in participating in the next round to register their interest by emailing mwyatt@mrsc.vic.gov.au or calling (03) 5421 9678

Composting and worm farms

Composting allows you to reduce the amount of waste you send to landfill. This reduces demand for new landfills, reduces green house gas emissions and prevents organic liquids in landfill leaching into nearby waterways.

While worm farms can be an excellent way to reduce the amount of organic waste going into landfill, worm farm productivity can vary. Peak activity will occur during warmer periods while in winter, activity will slow. It may also take several months before your worm population is working at optimal performance.

How to compost

  • Choose a suitable location for your bin. The warmer the location, the better it will perform.
  • Add a layer of dry material such as straw, sticks and dry leaves.
  • Begin to add green waste such as freshly cut leaves and kitchen scraps. Keep this layer a similar thickness to the dry layer below.
  • Add an additional dry material layer and then start adding your food scraps and garden clippings.
  • The compost should feel damp. If it is too wet, add dry materials like paper, hay or leaves. If it is too dry, hose it down a little and turn the compost until all the material is damp.
  • Remember to turn your compost every few weeks to keep it aerated.
  • Keep your compost covered to retain heat and moisture and to deter vermin.
  • It will take several months for you to be able to harvest the rich dark humus soil from your compost.

Download our Guide to Composting(PDF, 2MB) and Guide to Worm Farming(PDF, 2MB) for some quick tips about worm farms and composting.

Mulching

There are many benefits to mulching your garden. The the most important is for water conservation.

  • Mulch stops the top of the soil drying out, keeps the soil moist, and can reduce watering by about 60 per cent.
  • Mulching also prevents weeds and weed seed germination, which compete with plants for moisture and nutrients.
  • Mulching also keeps the soil temperature constant, and using an organic mulch means you're adding extra organic matter to the soil.

Mulching greatly improves soil conditions for the roots zone of all plants.

Mulch is available to buy at Council's transfer stations.